Mastering Complexity with Dane Barlow (Part 1)

Mastering Complexity with Dane Barlow (Part 1) - RD Podcast Joining me on the show today is Dane Barlow, a world-class ceramist and board member for the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry. In part one of our two-part interview, he shares his methods and experiences taking incredibly complex tasks, breaking them down into their individual components, and mastering them in a short amount of time.

Dane and I talk about dentistry, but mostly you’ll get to hear how he has developed a speed to skill development. From construction to business ownership and martial arts, Dane shares his story of transformation and insight on coming back from difficult times in life. He has managed to fit so much into his life, while still excelling at the things he takes on, so I know you’ll get a lot out of this conversation!

Key Quotes:

  • “I came to the conclusion that I was worth more dead than alive.”
  • “There was a whole period of my life where I had to learn to correct thought processes that were incorrect.”
  • “I was a fighter—I wasn’t going to give up. I was scrounging with everything I had to not get beat.”
  • “I say, ‘what do I want to accomplish?’ and then I find a way to do it.”
  • “If you have a dream goal and you work yourself like crazy, sometimes you’ll get there.”
  • “I was obsessed with obtaining the impossible, and anything I thought was right, I’d just do it.”
  • “I thought I was diversifying, but everything I did was tied into homeownership, and when home ownership disappeared, my businesses went to nothing.”
  • “If you’re doing something wrong, you add a coach.”
  • “I’m going to give back to other people, and I’m going to recognize when other people need some hope.”
  • “My dad said, ‘You’ll never be a hero’—but no, I’m sorry, but I’ve done it! I’ve done it.”
  • “You want to know the secret? There’s no secret. Do what successful people do, and then do all the things unsuccessful people won’t do, and don’t do the things that successful people wouldn’t do.”

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Saying So Long to My Mentor

There are people who make a lasting and indelible imprint on your life, and my Uncle Nim was one of those people for me. If it wasn’t for his influence and mentorship during my childhood, I don’t know what I would have done, or where I would be today.

This episode is a tribute to Uncle Nim as a way for me to process my grief, archive his impact on my life for my son, and let my friends and family know how much he truly meant to me. Rest in power, Uncle Nim.

Key Quotes:

  • “As much as I resisted it, I was shaped by a powerful environment during my teenage years.”
  • “We know in tribal communities that elders are the wisdom keepers, and they are held in high regard. Uncle Nim was that tribal elder for me.”
  • “I spent countless hours around [Uncle Nim] in my youth. I took for granted that he was planting seeds during this time. Like a good corn crop, these seeds planted, cultivated, irrigated, and nurtured would later reveal a great harvest.”
  • “Work fast, get done quick. Time and effort expended are largely irrelevant—its results that matter at the end of the day.”
  • “Better to have it and not need it, then need it and not have it.”
  • “Leadership isn’t always pretty.”
  • “Details matter.”
  • “It’s ok to mix a little play in your work.”

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Shortening the Learning Curve with Kyle Stanley

Shortening the Learning Curve with Kyle Stanley - RD Podcast

Dr. Kyle Stanley has accomplished a lot in dentistry at a young age, and he’s joining me to share his story and the journey that got him to where he is today. He gives incredible insight into how to tap into the most valuable resources around you in order to make your way to the top faster. He also explains how speaking about mental health issues has become a big part of his career and why it’s so important and valuable to him.

Listen in as we discuss how Kyle moved so quickly within the field, as well as the mindset and motivation behind the way he tackled dentistry. You’ll learn how he differentiates himself as a non-Beverly Hills – Beverly Hills dentist and why he chose to do dentistry a bit differently.

Key Quotes:

  • “There’s no way I could’ve done this without my mentors pushing me to the front of the line.”
  • “We really focus on taking our time.”
  • “I didn’t know speaking could be a career, but it’s turned into an important part of my profession.”
  • “By understanding the problems better, I was then able to fix the problems.”
  • “I wanted to let everyone know that they aren’t the only ones going through what they’re going through.”
  • “If you have feelings of depression or suicide, that doesn’t make you crazy—that makes you human.”

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Embracing the Process with Joe Blaylock

Embracing the Process with Joe Blaylock - Relentless Dentist PodcastToday Dr. Joe Blaylock joins me to share his transformation from losing his sense of purpose to dialing in and locking into a successful and impactful future. It’s easy to feel lost and frustrated coming out of dental school, and Joe opens up about how he was able to leverage coaching, mindset work, vision, and purpose to get him to where he is now.

Listen in as we discuss how he initially had a fear of having a startup, as well as what helped him overcome that fear. You’ll hear about some of the biggest challenges he has faced along his journey, what helped push him through, and how to see the big picture and understand the process that leads to success.

Key Quotes:

  • “In dental school, I always had the vision of having a startup, but I was too afraid to do it.”
  • “I fear it, but I need to do it.”
  • “It’s a personal development program with a compensation program attached to it.”
  • “The business will expose yourself to yourself, right? It’s a self-awareness program.”
  • “You put in above average effort, you will get above average results.”
  • “What I’ve learned is good and sustainable is a process.”
  • “You have to have the right people and you have to give them the roadmap.”

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Growing Pains with Dr. Nate Jeal

Growing Pains with Dr. Nate Jeal - Relentless Dentist Podcast

Dr. Nate Jeal has done a lot of things, making him a great example of how the journey to dentistry doesn’t have to be a straight path. His fascinating story and how he found his way into the field is both inspiring and eye-opening, and I know you’ll get a ton out of hearing him speak today.

Listen in as Nate shares why he gravitated toward dentistry, as well as how he eventually got into the field after coming from a totally different background. You’ll hear about the trials and challenges he faced while growing a business, how he and his wife got through those hardships, and the importance of perseverance as you navigate the path to success.

Key Quotes:

  • “The sense of scrappiness and doing whatever it takes to make the thing happen – that’s an important part of business ownership.”
  • “It’s in those challenges that you really get to learn.”
  • “Not all dentists have to be practice owners.”
  • “Despite all the challenges people talk about in dentistry, the opportunity that’s presented by a dental degree is really unparalleled.”
  • “If you have mental agility, you have the upper hand.”
  • “Most of your patients or customers—they can tell when the motivation is anything other than their wellbeing or quality.”
  • “In dentistry, the way to find success is by perfecting your craft, so becoming an excellent communicator, helping people really uncover what their wants are and to articulate the result people want to have—and then getting people that result in a really high-quality manner.”

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Taking the High Road to Better Dentistry with Dr. Bryan Stimmler

Taking the High Road to Better Dentistry with Dr. Bryan Stimmler

Sometimes the biggest challenges we deal with as dentists are moral dilemmas. It can be tempting not to admit to making a mistake—especially when you know a patient wouldn’t know the difference—or to advise someone to undergo an expensive procedure they don’t really need for the sake of making a higher profit. We’ve all been there, including Dr. Bryan Stimmler.

The owner of North Brooklyn Dental Care, Bryan is a big proponent of sharing the challenges we face as dentists, not just the successes. In fact, helping others to learn from his mistakes was his goal in starting The Better Dentistry Podcast. In this episode, Bryan opens up about the difficulties he’s faced along his dental journey, his own major mistakes, and the important lessons he learned as a result.

 

Key Quotes:

  • “I don’t care that you can do veneers, you know, I can do veneers too … I want to see a screw-up. I want to learn from your mess-ups.”
  • “There’s not a healthy communication on the challenges that [dentists] go through—whether it’s life or the business side of things or the clinical side of things—and we need to open up some discussion on that.”
  • “To be a good dentist, to do better dentistry, you’ve got to get your ego out of the way and you gotta do what’s right. … Better dentistry is getting back in there [after a mistake] and getting it to where it’s supposed to be and then swallowing your pride and apologizing to all of the patients that are waiting for you because you screwed up.”
  • “There’s a quote that kind of goes along the lines of, when you think your life is tough, someone’s always had it worse.”
  • “When someone’s quiet a lot of times, and then they dish out just a one-liner—those are the ones you need to listen to.”
  • “I hear from residents all the time that they don’t feel like they’re learning anything, and when you’re in the thick of things, you don’t even realize what you’re learning. We’re watching you work, and I can see your clinical proficiencies from when you started until when you ended, so you are learning, whether you think you are or not.”
  • “In hindsight, [my associateship] was so valuable that I’ve actually told residents, go find a bad associateship. If you have the intentions of opening up your own office, go see what the worst of the worst is. … You’ll find out everything that you shouldn’t be doing, and that’s much more valuable than getting an associate position at a place that is a well-oiled machine and you don’t even know what they’re doing that’s so good.”
  • “I always tell people to find a mentor. … Find some mentorship and read a lot.”

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