The Three Dysfunctions of a Dental Practice (Part 3)

The Three Dysfunctions of a Dental Practice (Part 3) - RD PodcastThis is part three of my series called “The Three Dysfunctions of a Dental Practice.” Before continuing with this episode, be sure to check out part one, where I talk about why dentists are looking for external solutions to their internal problems, and part two that covers a common false belief that many dentists have. In this third and final episode, I will discuss how dentists are often too busy working in their businesses and as a result, they fail to work on their businesses to give them the momentum that they need.

Listen in as I explain how to stop juggling every role and goal and trade it in for a structured and simplified framework that will help you be everything you need to be. And in order to get the greatest good from this training, I recommend that you take a look at the video training that latches directly on to today’s episode. It provides some great visuals and stories to help you understand why prioritization is so important and what might happen if you ignore this blueprint for your life and practice.

Enroll in your free video training here: How The Most Successful Dental Practice Owners Work Less & Make More Every Year

Key Quotes:

  • “If we have the intention and intensity to be really good at a role, the outputs will be much more favorable.”
  • “There are three activators to practice mastery: one is marketing, one is innovation, and one is cost control.”
  • “As the practice owner, you have a ton of roles, a ton of goals, and switching from one to the other is an exhausting process that leads to all sorts of problems like burnout and other ugly things.”
  • “The most important day in a businessperson’s life is the day they stop being a doer and start being a marketer.”
  • “If you become more valuable to the marketplace, you become less replaceable and that gives you options.”
  • “Your practice should deliver more time freedom and more financial freedom to you year after year.”

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The Three Dysfunctions of a Dental Practice (Part 2)

This is part two of my three-part series called “The Three Dysfunctions of a Dental Practice.” Before continuing with this episode, I encourage you to listen to part one, where I share why dentists are constantly looking for external solutions to their internal problems and how to fix this. Today I will be discussing the false belief many dentists have that their number one job is being a good clinician when it is actually being a good leader.

Listen in as I explain three activators that drive mastery within your practice: goodwill, case acceptance, and team building. You will learn the importance of building trust and rapport with your clients, how to create a “surprise and delight” aspect of your service, and how to ensure you have the right members on your team. If you are looking to grow your business and create long-lasting clients, this is the episode for you.

Enroll in your free video training here: How The Most Successful Dental Practice Owners Work Less & Make More Every Year

Key Quotes:

  • “Everything you do is a marketing asset or a marketing liability.”
  • “A dental practice isn’t limited by its opportunities—it’s limited by its leader.”
  • “You can’t really fake trust, so you have to make sure that you and your team are working in your patient’s interest.”
  • “When it comes to team building, we have to make sure we have the right players on the team.”
  • “Ideal team players are hungry, humble, and smart.”

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The Three Dysfunctions of a Dental Practice (Part 1)

Today I’m kicking off a new 3-part series called “The Three Dysfunctions of a Dental Practice.” These dysfunctions are alive and well in most dental practices, and they’re usually hidden in plain sight. So in this first episode of the series, I’ll be discussing how dentists are constantly looking for external solutions to their internal problems—and what to do about it.

This section is specific to identity, so I’ll explain how the organization takes on the personality of its leader, as well as how we need to be working on our own personal mastery in order to level up our practices. If you struggle with delegation or feel like your team is too busy to take on more, you need to hear this because it is essential not only for your ability to grow, but also for your practice’s ability to grow.

Enroll in your free video training here: How The Most Successful Dental Practice Owners Work Less & Make More Every Year

Key Quotes:

  • “If we embrace these internal problems, the possibility is that we acknowledge that we are the bottleneck of the practice, and we can find ways to unlock its true potential and establish a more confident identity.”
  • “If we don’t expand the capabilities and the identity of the leader, we work really hard for limited gain.”
  • “Our energy is a role model for the whole team. We can’t expect our team members to be more passionate about the practice than we are.”
  • “If it brings you energy, you need to double down on it.”
  • “We have a leadership vacuum in our world, and what needs to fill this vacuum is high-integrity, courageous leaders.”
  • “Full expression seems like an act of selfishness, but ultimately, it becomes an act of selflessness.”
  • “We have this inner voice as dentists that says, ‘If it’s going to be done right, it’s gotta be done by us.’ But there’s an art to delegation.”
  • “A barrier to delegation is feeling like the team already has too much work and you don’t want to put more on their plate. That’s a bit of a farce.”

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Private Practice Startups: Purpose Over Paychecks with Jayme Amos

Jayme Amos joins us today to drop some much-needed wisdom bombs about private practice startups and why now might just be the perfect time to seize on a startup opportunity. One of the original dental podcasters, Jayme is a best-selling author, an expert in building practices, and the founder of dentistry’s most popular website for opening dental offices.

Listen in as he shares how to know whether you’re ready to open a practice, what purpose (and not a paycheck) should be the driving force behind your intention, and how to embrace the identity of CEO to lead a team, build a culture, and cast the vision of the practice. If you’re a young associate or have been toying with the idea of starting your own private practice, this episode was made for you.

Key Quotes:

  • “Running a business can be an endurance game.”
  • “If you show up every day and it’s just about a paycheck, and it’s not about purpose, you’re not going to make it.”
  • “If you have the purpose established, you can instantly be respected as a community leader.”
  • “The first step is super important, and that’s defining the vision.”
  • “Let’s figure out what would make you happy because I know a lot of people with really low overhead percentages who are really unhappy.”
  • “If the disease is fear, the cure or the antidote is trust.”

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How We Communicate with Dr. Chris Bowman

We often complete trainings on and talk about things we only use and do on occasion, but we tend to put important things that we use all the time—like communication—on the back burner. In this episode, Dr. Chris Bowman joins me to break down the importance of communicating more effectively. We discuss the obligation we have to our patients and how communication will help us fulfill what is ethical and incredibly beneficial to them and our practices.

Listen in as Chris shares where most dentists miss out on having maximum satisfaction from their practice, as well as how to make better decisions and present options to patients in a consistent and practical manner. You’ll learn the issues with confidence that affect our ability to do these things, how we tend to make judgments that are off, and what makes patients more likely to follow our advice.

Key Quotes:

  • “The biggest difference between the dentists who do well and the dentists who don’t is those who just get into it and do it.”
  • “Telling someone something they don’t want to hear takes courage.”
  • “There are certain skills that will get replaced by machines, but things like communication and connection—that human need will never be replaced.”
  • “We have an obligation to let patients know what we can do for them, as well as the things that are or are not moving in the direction they want it to go.”
  • “Patients are more likely to follow our advice when they know we ethically have their back.”
  • “Everyone wants the problems that they know they have to go away. So if we get really good at explaining the problems and conditions and how those things are not going the way that they want, then we can get really effective at gaining acceptance for our treatment recommendations.”
  • “It becomes more about presenting and selling a problem rather than presenting and selling a solution.”

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Unrealistic Expectations and Silent Suffering with Tiger Safarov

Comparison and unrealistic expectations are often not talked about, but both happen frequently in dentistry. Today Tiger Safarov, founder of dental inventory management software ZenSupplies, joins the show to discuss the worrying topic of depression in dentistry and how to handle the stress of debt after schooling.

Listen in as Tiger shares what he thinks you should delegate to your assistant so you don’t feel overwhelmed, as well as why you should value your dental assistant. You’ll learn the importance of allowing yourself to make mistakes, how to connect with your team, and more.

Key Quotes:

  • “Just do the right thing. Keep moving and keep building.”
  • “There is a huge disconnect of your expectations and what happens when you finish dental school.”
  • “We take this identity of expert and we put it in all these places where we have no expertise … That’s where dentists end up in this place of burnout.”
  • “My biggest concern is that there are too many people suffering in silence.”
  • “The longer you’re sidetracked, the harder it is to course-correct.”
  • “Permission to make mistakes is so important.”

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